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Seven Steps to a Successful Barbecue

Summer will be upon us before we know it, and with it comes the prospect of family fun and social gatherings around the barbecue; there’s something very special about long lazy summer days and the smoky flavour of barbecued meat eaten in the company of friends.

Whilst barbeque parties are great social occasions, don’t ruin them by giving your guests food poisoning! In the UK, cases of food poisoning rise significantly over the summer months; many of which can be directly attributed to poor food safety practices on the BBQ.

Far too many happy gatherings are spoilt by the unpleasant consequences of food that has been stored at the wrong temperature, handled by people with unwashed hands, and not cooked sufficiently long enough, at a high enough temperate, to eliminate potentially hazardous bacteria. Often the person responsible for cooking at a BBQ has never received any training in food safety; therefore the potential for a serious food poisoning incident to occur is very high.

We recommend you strictly observe the following 7 points if you want to keep your guests safe and happy and yourself stress-free, when you host your next BBQ.

1.Plan ahead – make sure the BBQ, which has probably not been used for several months, is given a through clean and safety check. Light the BBQ well in advance of the time you will begin cooking. Charcoal should be glowing hot – it can take about an hour from the time of lighting the fire to reach ideal cooking temperature.
 
2.Don’t wash raw meat – all this does is splash bacteria around the sink, taps and work surfaces that need to be kept completely free from contamination.
3.Store raw meat covered, in appropriate containers at the bottom of the fridge until needed for cooking.
4.Pre-cook the meat in your kitchen oven before finishing off on the BBQ.
 5.Food waiting to be cooked should be stored in a cool box with a lid to prevent contamination by insects or pets.
 6.Keep cooked and raw foods separate, and always use separate tongs and utensils to prevent cross contamination.
 7.Wash hands thoroughly between tasks, but especially after handling raw meat. Keep your food preparation area scrupulously clean and free from discarded food at all times. Keep children well away from the BBQ, as well as those adults not involved with the cooking.

Happy barbecuing!

Childwickbury Cheese

Cheshire Cheese is Britain’s oldest cheese as it is believed to have been produced in Cheshire, by the Romans. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book in the 11th Century. Young Cheshire is bright and white in colour. It is a firm bodied cheese with a crumbly texture that breaks down gently in the mouth.
It has a mild, milky taste and aroma, and is clean and fresh on the palette with a very slightly tangy finish. You can get coloured Cheshire cheese, such as red Cheshire, which gets it colouring from a red vegetable dye Annatto. Despite the difference in colour the taste and texture of the cheese is the same
as the white version.

Cheshire Cheese

Cheshire Cheese is Britain’s oldest cheese as it is believed to have been produced in Cheshire, by the Romans. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book in the 11th Century. Young Cheshire is bright and white in colour. It is a firm bodied cheese with a crumbly texture that breaks down gently in the mouth.
It has a mild, milky taste and aroma, and is clean and fresh on the palette with a very slightly tangy finish. You can get coloured Cheshire cheese, such as red Cheshire, which gets it colouring from a red vegetable dye Annatto. Despite the difference in colour the taste and texture of the cheese is the same
as the white version.

Cerney Pyramid Cheese

Cerney Pyramid is a soft goat cheese shaped in a truncated pyramid, hence the name. It is hand-coated with an oakash/seasalt mix, which gives it its black coating. The cheese has a subtle flavour with a hint of a lemony tang. The flavour deepens with age. What makes Cerney Pyramid a great cheese is that tt was one of the original goats cheeses produced in the UK and it won a number of accolades in 2015, including Best Goats Cheese and Super Gold awards at the World Cheese awards.

Caerphilly Cheese

Caerphilly, named after the town in Wales where it originated from, as both a flavouring and texture that is that of a Cheddar, hence it being in that family of cheeses. It is a very crumbly cheese, just like Cheshire and Wensleydale cheeses. 

Caerphilly is made from unpasteurised cows’ milk and takes 8 to 14 days to mature. 

Bosworth Cheese

Bosworth Goats Cheese also referred to as Bosworth Leaf or Bosworth Ash Log. is an unpasteurised, semi-soft cheese made from goat’s milk. It has a white, crumbly center with a mild, salty-sweet and goat flavouring. 

There is a distinct difference between Bosworth Leaf and Bosworth Ash Log. The first is sold wrapped in a chestnut leaf while Bosworth Ash Log is rolled in salted charcoal underneath a layer of white rind. The cheese is aged for three weeks and has a fat content of 45 per cent. 

Berkswell Cheese

Berkswell cheese is produced using unpasturised ewes’ milk and yet it has the aroma of Goat to it. One unusual fact about the making of this cheese is that the moulds are left in plastic kitchen colanders which enable the cheese to have the shape it does. It is not suitable for vegetarians due to the fact that animal rennet is added in during its production. The best wine to go with this cheese is any sweet wine, to contrast the acidity. 

Beenleigh Blue Cheese

Beenleigh Blue is unique in the fact that it is one of the few blue sheep’s milk cheeses that are produced in the UK. Cylindrical in shape, it has a nice natural rind that is a little sticky with blue and white mould and a white inside that has blue streaks through it.

The flavour has a burnt caramel sweet taste to it and is a great addition if you are drinking Mead, Port, Cabernet Merlot or Sweet Cider.